Mucus is your body’s natural source of antiseptic enzymes. Not only does it trap harmful foreign substances, but it lines the organs and cavities in your body with a viscous, protective layer that helps food move through your esophagus and protects the walls of your stomach from acidic digestive juices. However, your ENT in Amherst wants you to know that mucus of different colors can spell trouble. If you notice yellow, green, brown, orange, or black mucus, you could have a serious infection on your hands.

Yellow or Green Mucus:

Mucus is normally clear. If it’s white, you’re probably fighting off a cold, but if it’s yellow or green, you’re probably fighting off a bacterial infection. Your body won’t produce yellow or green mucus just because of allergies. If you notice green or yellow mucus, you should speak to your physician as soon as you get the chance so that he/she can provide you with an antibiotic.

Brown or Orange Mucus:

Your mucus might turn red, pink, orange, or even brown if you’ve had a nosebleed or if you’ve been blowing your nose a lot. Pregnant women also sometimes have red or pink mucus because of changing hormones, but in the vast majority of cases, it’s just a sign that the nose is too dry.

When you blow your nose too hard, you risk tearing the membranes covering the inside of the nose. When these membranes dry out, which they often do in winter anyway, they’ll bleed into the mucus. If you notice mucus with a red tint, there’s no need to call the ENT in Amherst. Unless there’s a lot of blood, a bowl of soup and a hot shower will do the trick.

Black Mucus:

Black mucus can be a cause for concern, but it isn’t necessarily. Black mucus can be a sign of lung cancer, pneumonia, or tuberculosis, but it’s more likely a sign of cigarette smoke or pollution. If you live in a very populated city or you’ve been in a large fire, your mucus might turn black temporarily, in which case your mucus will turn back to normal on its own. If it doesn’t, you should call your ENT in Amherst because it could be a sign of an illness.

Your ENT in Amherst is Here for You:

It’s important to pay attention to the color of bodily discharge. The color of your urine, feces, and mucus can tell you a lot about your health. Make sure you’re paying attention to your body so that you spot infections at the very initial stages before they have time to progress into serious conditions.

Can I Keep My Pet If I Have Cat Allergies?

If you suffer from mild cat allergies, you may still be able to keep your cat. As long as your cat allergies aren’t severe, a few simple lifestyle changes might help ease your symptoms on a daily basis. Keep reading, because below you’ll find our best tips for dealing with cat allergies in Buffalo, NY without loading up on drugs and sprays. So, before you come searching for the allergist, try implementing these three easy changes.

This Canadian Native Suffers from a Rare Cold Allergy

You’ve heard of environmental and food allergies, but you’ve never heard of a cold allergy
especially in Buffalo, NY.

The hard-to-swallow facts about your salivary glands!

THE SALIVARY GLAND SYSTEM | A person’s health can be thoroughly evaluated just in their saliva alone! Though saliva is mostly comprised of water, it also contains hormones, minerals, enzymes and proteins, plus antibacterial and other substances that are prime indicators of whether or not we’re in optimal condition. Things like our dental health and our body’s pH balance are directly connected to our salivary glands.

Can Live Christmas Trees Trigger Allergy Symptoms?

December is here, and it seems like everyone is in the holiday spirit…well most of us our at least. If you’ve been feeling under the weather the past couple of weeks, it might be because of your Christmas tree. Believe it or not, live Christmas trees in Buffalo, NY have been found to trigger symptoms for those with allergies to mold.

Western New York Living features Dr. Paul Young

Western New York Living features Dr. Paul Young | ENT Buffalo NY |

Pediatric ENT: For Tiny Ears, Noses, and Throats

Pediatric Ear, Nose, and Throat | Your little bundle of joy is unique not only personally but also anatomically. If your child has a terrible case of the sniffles, then you might need a doctor who specializes pediatric ear, nose, and throat disorders. ENTs that specialize in pediatrics will be able to cater to your child’s specific needs.

Are You Really Allergic or Just Intolerant?

Just because you’re intolerant to a food doesn’t mean you’re allergic. Find out whether you need to visit the allergy doctor in Buffalo, NY. | Just because you feel sick when you eat a certain food doesn’t necessarily mean you’re allergic to it. While your symptoms may be more or less the same either way, differing perhaps only by degree, an intolerance and an allergy are two totally different things. While an intolerance may put your body in discomfort, an allergy will mobilize your entire immune system. If you’re planning to visit the allergy doctor in Buffalo, NY, you’ll want to keep this difference in mind.

LEAVE THE WATER AT THE SEASHORE: SWIMMER’S EAR & STAYING DRY

How to Remove Water From Your Ear | Water trapped in your ear is not only irritating. If you leave it for too long, you can develop an ear infection fittingly referred to as swimmer’s ear. Thankfully, if you know how to remove water from your ear on your own, the condition should never progress to that point.

How to Control Dog Skin Allergies

There are plenty of simple ways to control dog skin allergies. Discover how you can keep your
favorite pup here in Buffalo, NY without sneezing up a storm.

Nosebleeds ~ the drippy (but not so dreadful) reality

Epistaxis, a condition commonly referred to as nosebleeds, occurs at the vascular area within the nose, which can bleed profusely as a result of facial trauma. The nose’s arterioles (tiny blood vessels) are vulnerably positioned and thus can easily rupture.

Approximately 60 percent of people experience epistaxis at some point in their life. Only 6 percent of those who suffer with nosebleeds tend to seek medical treatment, and even fewer require hospitalization.

Though epistaxis can occur at any age, it mostly has a bimodal distribution, afflicting toddlers to children age 10, as well as adults over 50. There are two types of nosebleeds – those that stem from the front of the nose (anterior) which are most common, and those that stem from the back of the nose (posterior) which are less common and more severe in nature.