If you notice pain or pressure behind your eyes around your sinuses, you may be suffering from a sinus headache. Frequent sinus headaches are certainly a cause for concern, and if you find yourself constantly congested, you should visit an ENT to discover the real root of the problem.

However, in the meantime, you can turn to over-the-counter drugs for a bit of temporary relief. Below, we’ll discuss the three common types of sinus headache medicine and how they can help.

Painkillers:

Medications like ibuprophen (Advil, Motrin IB), acetaminophen (Tylenol), and naproxen sodium (Aleve) keep the body from producing prostaglandins, which are associated with pain and inflammation—hence the name painkiller. They are non-steroidal and function at the cellular level. Painkillers can also be used for migraine headaches, but will not help with the congestion.

Decongestants:

Decongestants, like Sudafed, for example, will help ease the tension in your head by reducing inflammation and narrowing the blood vessels in your nose. They usually come as pills but are also available in liquid form or as a nasal spray.

You can take decongestants a few times a day if you need to. Decongestants are particularly helpful as sinus headache medicine because they target your sinuses specifically; however, they are also stimulants, so you’ll want to avoid taking them right before bed.

Antihistamines:

Most people choose to take either a painkiller or decongestant when suffering from congestion. If your headache is caused by your allergies though, antihistamines might be your sinus headache medicine of choice.

Antihistamines block histamines, the chemical associated with immune and inflammatory responses, thereby stopping your allergic reaction. Because antihistamines are depressants though, so make sure not to take them during the day when you’ll need to be alert.

Sinus Headache Medicine in a Pinch

The best sinus headache medicine is of course plenty of fluids and a bit of TLC. There are many treatments that will help ease your pain naturally; however, if you need some instant relief, you should consider over-the-counter medication.

That being said, if you are taking these medications regularly for ten days in a row, you should consult your physician to find a more permanent solution.

The Best Remedy For Allergy-Related Sore Throats

Sore throat killing you? Unfortunately, a sore throat is a common side effect of environmental allergies. Thankfully, allergy drugs aren’t your only option. Using ingredients you probably have on hand already, you can whip up a delicious pot of vegetable soup. Here’s our best recipe—from our Buffalo, NY clinic, to your kitchen.

WNY Living | Dr. Paul Young, MD

WNY Living | Dr Paul Young MD | ENT Buffalo NY Janet Snyder: From Allergy problems to tonsillitis, otolaryngologists also knows as ENT’s, treat problems of the ears, nose and throat. Here to shed light on those problems and what can be done is Dr Paul Young. Thank you...

What is the allergy forecast in Buffalo, NY?

The Buffalo, NY allergy forecast can tell you the daily pollen count for specific plants and trees in that area. By measuring the average number of grains of pollen per cubic meter of air, the pollen count serves as a rough guide to breathing comfort for anyone who may suffer from environmental allergies.

3 Signs Your Sinus Doctor Will Prescribe Surgery

Find yourself with a stuffy nose again? An occasional sinus infection is fairly normal, but if you’re suffering from constant congestion and chronic sinus infections, there may be a more systemic problem. Here are the three signs that your sinus doctor in Amherst will need to prescribe surgery.

Your Cold Might Actually Be a Sign of Fall Allergies

While most people in Buffalo, NY assume spring is high allergy season, for many, September is the worst time of the year. Do you suffer from fall allergies?

How to Get Rid of Allergies With Diet

There are plenty of medications you can use to treat your allergies in Buffalo, NY, but if you
want to know how to get rid of allergies, look at your plate.

What Does a WNY ENT Doctor Do?

Not quite sure what body part is the ENT? You can’t find ENT’s anywhere on your body because the name is an acronym. ENT stands for ear, nose, and throat, and physicians associated with this branch of medical science are known as otolaryngologists. Below, we talk more about what a WNY ENT doctor does on a regular basis, what you can expect from your first appointment, and what kind of surgeries you might expect.

Health Tips From the Best ENT Doctors in WNY

An apple a day should be able to keep your general practitioner away, but the same cannot be said for the ENT. However, there are some things you can do to keep your ears, nose, and throat healthy. After all, the best treatment is preventative treatment. So, without further ado, here are the top tips from the best ENT doctors in WNY.

3 Quick Ways to Treat Sinus Symptoms

Sinus infections come with a whole host of aggravating symptoms, and if you’ve ever had an infection, you know how irritating it can be. Unfortunately, most sinus infections are viral, meaning that antibiotics won’t be effective. Thankfully, there are natural alternatives to treating sinus symptoms in Buffalo, NY that will have you back up on your feet in no time.

Nosebleeds ~ the drippy (but not so dreadful) reality

Epistaxis, a condition commonly referred to as nosebleeds, occurs at the vascular area within the nose, which can bleed profusely as a result of facial trauma. The nose’s arterioles (tiny blood vessels) are vulnerably positioned and thus can easily rupture.

Approximately 60 percent of people experience epistaxis at some point in their life. Only 6 percent of those who suffer with nosebleeds tend to seek medical treatment, and even fewer require hospitalization.

Though epistaxis can occur at any age, it mostly has a bimodal distribution, afflicting toddlers to children age 10, as well as adults over 50. There are two types of nosebleeds – those that stem from the front of the nose (anterior) which are most common, and those that stem from the back of the nose (posterior) which are less common and more severe in nature.