As it turns out, humans emit a certain odor when infected with disease. Though our olfactory senses are not developed enough to detect it, studies conducted with rodents show that even people who live with someone who is infected will give off a certain odor. Nose doctors in Amherst have yet to use this for any clinical ends, but they are hopeful that this information could teach the medical world more about how contagious diseases spread.

Why Would Diseases Produce Odors?

Even though humans are not nearly as in touch with their olfaction as rodents are, they can detect a wide range of scents. Even if you don’t consciously register the decision, you’re less likely to sit next to someone on the bus, for instance, who has a cold simply because he’s sick.

It’s likely that people developed an intuitive sense for the scent of diseases for evolutionary purposes. Historically speaking, if people are to live successfully in communities, it’s important that they learn to quarantine anyone who has an illness so that it doesn’t spread to the rest of the society.

Recent Studies:

Scientists have already used canine olfaction to detect early signs of ovarian cancer. More recently, scientists used mice to see how diseases can affect the odor of people who share a living space. Stephanie Gervasi, the lead author in the study, injected lipopolysaccharide, a non-contagious toxin that produces inflammation, into a group of healthy mice and kept them in the same cage as healthy mice.

Biosensor mice, mice who had been trained to identify the urine of the infected rodents, had a hard time distinguishing between the two mice even when they had been kept separated by a divider in the same cage.

What Does This Mean for Nose Doctors in Amherst?

Nose doctors in Amherst, unlike rodents, have a much harder time identifying diseases purely by scent. Instead, they have to judge based on a patient’s symptoms and bloodwork. If scientists could develop a way to identify the presence of a disease based on its scent, physicians might be able to spot dangerous diseases in their early stages when they’re still easily treatable.

Book a Visit with a Nose Doctor in Amherst Today!

What to Expect From an Allergist in Buffalo, NY

Nervous for your first visit to the allergist in Buffalo, NY? Don’t be! Here’s what to expect and how to best prepare for your upcoming appointment.

School Supplies Drive

at Paul Young, MD – ENT Clinic | Supplies will be donated to Buffalo area kids in need. | School Supplies Needed | Backpacks, folders, pencils, crayons, paper, erasers, rulers, scissors, glue, etc. | Drop off items at our office: 4955 N Bailey Ave #202, Buffalo, NY. 14226

What to Do if Your Baby is Congested

Buffalo, NY natives know how to brave the tough winter weather, but they don’t always know how to control rough winter allergy symptoms.

What is the Definition of an Allergy?

What are allergies anyway? Why do they exist in the first place? How do people develop them, and is there any way to cure them? As it turns out, allergies are still a bit of a medical mystery. While we do know how to treat them, we don’t know exactly why they exist. That being said, here’s your Buffalo, NY ENT’s allergy definition.

How to Deal With a Dairy Allergy in Buffalo, NY

If ordering out for pizza used to be your favorite Saturday night treat, then a dairy allergy in Buffalo, NY could really shake things up. Thankfully, there are plenty of simple ways to cope with dairy allergies that don’t involve sacrificing on taste.

Why is Buffalo’s Allergy Report So Bad?

Ever checked out the allergy report in Buffalo, NY in relation to the rest of the country? Though it differs from year to year, Buffalo consistently ranks within the top worst cities for allergies. Why is this exactly?
What is the Allergy Report in Buffalo, NY? Buffalo ranked 16 according to Live Science’s average report in 2013 based on the average pollen count, the ratio of allergists to patients, and the rate of allergy medicine use.

The Allergy Remedies You Never Considered

Buffalo, NY natives know how to brave the tough winter weather, but they don’t always know how to control rough winter allergy symptoms.

Allergy Testing Could Help Prevent Anxiety in Teens

Adolescents in Buffalo, NY are busier than they ever were before. With violin lessons, baseball practice, youth group, social activities, and homework, they’re constantly under pressure. A recent study finds that those who also suffer from hay fever might be at a higher risk for developing depression and anxiety because of the added stress. If your child has an allergy, allergy testing can help you identify the allergen and develop an actionable plan for relief.

How Dogs Can Prevent Dog Allergies and Asthma

If you have a four-footed friend living at home here in Buffalo, NY, then you know how much joy cats and dogs can bring to your life. However, you probably didn’t know that they are also beneficial to your health. As it turns out, recent research reveals that babies that grow up with animals in the house may be less likely to develop cat and dog allergies and asthma when they’re older.

3 Easy Ways to Sleep Better with Allergies

You haven’t noticed your allergies all day until you’re ready to go to bed when suddenly your symptoms hit you. With a runny nose and itchy eyes, how are you ever going to get any sleep? As it turns out, yes, allergy levels in Buffalo, NY tend to rise at night. While pollen levels are highest in the morning, the bedroom tends to aggravate symptoms.