Allergies have always seemed a bit mysterious. While we’ve developed plenty of ways to treat allergy symptoms, we still know very little about what causes allergies in the first place. However, there has been a dramatic increase in the number of people who suffer from allergies—and scientists suspect that it’s probably not related to genetics. Interestingly enough, a new, promising study links the rise in dust-mite allergies to dietary changes.

What Are Dust-Mite Allergies?

Dust-mites are microscopic creatures measuring 1/3-¼ of a millimeter that feeds on dead skin left from humans and animals. As it turns out, every single day, an adult will shed up to 1.5g of skin, which is enough to feed over a million dust mites. A certain protein in a dust-mite's waste is known as a common allergen. Unfortunately, dust-mites produce up to 200 times their body weight in the fecal matter over the course of their lifetimes.

What Have We Learned About Dust-Mite Allergies?

A study conducted by the South Australian Health and Medical Research Institute found in a trial run that mothers who took omega-3 pills while pregnant significantly reduced the chances that their children would develop a dust-mite allergy. The children were 40% less likely to suffer from dust-mite allergies and hay fever if their mothers had taken fish oil supplements. While the findings are not necessarily conclusive, they are very promising. After all, if allergies are linked to nutrient imbalances, we can easily prevent them.

What Does That Mean for You?

You should always make sure you’re eating a healthy diet, but you should be especially careful during pregnancy. It’s incredibly important that your intake of omega-3 to omega-6 fatty acids is in proportion.

According to the findings in this study, you might be able to reduce your child’s risk of developing dust-mite allergies simply by limiting your intake of fast foods, processed oils, and animal products. You should also make sure to get some omega-3's in your diet by adding some delicious salmon, flax seeds, and walnuts to your meals from time to time.

Ear infection vs. fluid in the ear, which one is it?

Chronic ear infections, or otitis media, is a common childhood illness. As we age, our anatomy changes allowing for better drainage from the inner ear, which decreases our risk for infection. Most children will have less frequent infections by middle adolescence. It...

The Allergy Remedies You Never Considered

Buffalo, NY natives know how to brave the tough winter weather, but they don’t always know how to control rough winter allergy symptoms.

Allergy Specialists Develop A New Way to Track Pollen

Allergy specialists from Bangor University are developing unique technology that could help Buffalo, NY natives to better understand the pollen forecast.

What Your Nose Doctor Wants You to Know About Body Odor

Buffalo, NY natives know how to brave the tough winter weather, but they don’t always know how to control rough winter allergy symptoms.

What ENT Drs in Amherst Want You to Know About Honey

Buffalo, NY natives know how to brave the tough winter weather, but they don’t always know how to control rough winter allergy symptoms.

What can I expect at my ENT consultation?

Going to a medical specialist for the first time can be nerve-racking, especially if you’re already worried about your health. However, you can rest easy because you have nothing to fear. Below you’ll find a brief description of what you can expect from your first ENT...

How to Get Rid of Allergies With Diet

There are plenty of medications you can use to treat your allergies in Buffalo, NY, but if you
want to know how to get rid of allergies, look at your plate.

Can you eat before an ENT appointment?

The medical world can be overwhelming. Sometimes you should eat to keep your strength up, and at other times you need to start on an empty stomach. How can patients keep track of all of these differences? Well, if you’re preparing for an ENT appointment in Buffalo,...

ENT Care in WNY for Vocal Disorders

Laryngitis, inflammation of the vocal cords, is typically responsible for your hoarse voice. While laryngitis can be caused by a bacterial or viral infection, it might also be caused by a straining of the vocal cords. Laryngitis can, however, become a chronic condition if it’s a result of long-term irritation.