While traveling can be a wonderful adventure, traveling itself is rarely enjoyable and usually miserable. It can be particularly difficult if you suffer from pet allergies. Even if there aren’t any animals on board, pet owners will have animal dander on their clothes and belongings. Here are our best five tips for keeping dog allergy symptoms in check when on the move.

Preboard:

Tell the flight staff that you suffer from allergies and ask them if you can board in the first round of passengers so you can prepare your space. When you find your seat, make sure to wipe down your seat, the back of the seat in front of you, the armrests, and the small table that folds down in front of you. Bring along wet wipes to completely disinfect the area around you.

Call Ahead:

Call the airline a few weeks before your departure date to ask if there are any passengers who plan to bring pets aboard. Explain that you suffer from dog allergy symptoms, and ask to be seated at the other end of the plane.

Gear Up:

Bring your medications in your carry-on and make sure to take them out when you board the plane so you can store them in the back of the seat in front of you for easy access.

Don’t Touch Anything:

As it turns out, the inside of an airplane is rarely cleaned, especially the complimentary blankets and pillows. If you suffer from dog allergy symptoms, don’t even bother taking them out. If you think you’ll need one for the trip, make sure to bring your own.

Dress Right:

Consider wearing a scarf and sunglasses the day you’re traveling. Not only will you look stylish, but the scarf and sunglasses can help protect your mouth, nose, and eyes from any allergens floating around. Don’t Let Dog Allergy Symptoms Ruin Your Trip! The last place you want to have an allergy or asthma attack is somewhere in the middle of the highway or 10,000 miles up in the air. So, make sure you take the necessary precautions to make your trip as smooth as possible.

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