It’s normal to come down with a cold when the weather changes. If you suffer from allergies though, it can be difficult to know whether your nose is stuffy because of the pollen in the air or the bacteria in your bloodstream. Thankfully, there’s a simple way to tell. Allergies cannot cause a fever. Here’s why.

The Difference Between Allergies & Colds:

When you have a bacterial or viral infection, your body will trigger an immune response. Chemicals called pyrogens, which are produced by white blood cells, cause the temperature in the body to rise. This is a normal inflammatory response that helps to kill off heat-sensitive bacteria.

Allergens, on the other hand, set off no such reaction. During an allergic reaction, your body releases histamines, which make you sneeze and cough. Histamines are only released during allergic reactions, which is why you shouldn’t take anti-histamine medication for the common cold or flu.

Can Allergies Cause Fevers Indirectly?

Allergies can take quite a toll on your immune system. If your white blood cells are busy fighting off pollen, you might find yourself feeling weak. It’s not uncommon to come down with a cold or sinus infection in the midst of allergy season. Sinuses filled with mucus are breeding grounds for bacteria. In this case, allergies can cause a fever, but only indirectly.

If you do come down with a cold during allergy season, you need to make sure that you’re taking extra precautions to stay hydrated and relax so your body can recover. It can be exhausting for your body to fight on two fronts at the same time.

Are You Sure Those Are Allergies?

Even if you don’t have a fever, you should make sure to take good care of yourself. Untreated allergies can cause serious sinus infections and even asthma down the line. If you try to self-medicate, or worse, ignore your symptoms, you could end up doing more harm than good.

Watch out for bad breath, yellow or green mucus, and any chills or hot flashes. It may just be a simple case of the sniffles now, but if you don’t speak with your physician about the proper treatment plans, your allergies will cause more than a fever down the line. Final Thoughts:

So, the answer, in short, is yes: allergies can cause fever. However, they don’t cause fever in the way you might expect. If you’ve been struggling with allergies this year, don’t brush them off. Make a call to your local Buffalo ENT to discuss your symptoms and possible treatment options. The longer your symptoms go untreated, the worse they could become. So, take care of them today.

How to Get Rid of Allergies With Diet

There are plenty of medications you can use to treat your allergies in Buffalo, NY, but if you
want to know how to get rid of allergies, look at your plate.

How Dogs Can Prevent Dog Allergies and Asthma

If you have a four-footed friend living at home here in Buffalo, NY, then you know how much joy cats and dogs can bring to your life. However, you probably didn’t know that they are also beneficial to your health. As it turns out, recent research reveals that babies that grow up with animals in the house may be less likely to develop cat and dog allergies and asthma when they’re older.

Top 3 Myths About Seasonal Allergies Symptoms

Sometimes old wives’ tales are true, but more often than not, they turn out to be false. The case is definitely true for seasonal allergies symptoms. Here we’re going to debunk the three most common allergy myths. We don’t know where these stories came from, but there is definitely no scientific evidence behind them.

Allergy Testing Could Help Prevent Anxiety in Teens

Adolescents in Buffalo, NY are busier than they ever were before. With violin lessons, baseball practice, youth group, social activities, and homework, they’re constantly under pressure. A recent study finds that those who also suffer from hay fever might be at a higher risk for developing depression and anxiety because of the added stress. If your child has an allergy, allergy testing can help you identify the allergen and develop an actionable plan for relief.

What is the Best Allergy Medicine for Me?

Make sure to consult with a professional in Buffalo, NY before heading out to the drug store. While many people do self-diagnose, you’ll really want to make sure before assuming that you’ve found the best allergy medicine on your own. You wouldn’t want to end up with unnecessary complications, and plus, your doctor may be able to provide you with a more effective treatment plan you wouldn’t have found otherwise.

You Have an Asthma Allergy in Buffalo, NY, Avoid This!

If you have an asthma allergy in Buffalo, NY, you’re not significantly more likely to come down with the flu or even the common cold than the rest of us. However, because you already suffer from inflammation, even a simple virus could put you at risk for serious respiratory diseases.

What is the allergy forecast in Buffalo, NY?

The Buffalo, NY allergy forecast can tell you the daily pollen count for specific plants and trees in that area. By measuring the average number of grains of pollen per cubic meter of air, the pollen count serves as a rough guide to breathing comfort for anyone who may suffer from environmental allergies.

Nosebleeds ~ the drippy (but not so dreadful) reality

Epistaxis, a condition commonly referred to as nosebleeds, occurs at the vascular area within the nose, which can bleed profusely as a result of facial trauma. The nose’s arterioles (tiny blood vessels) are vulnerably positioned and thus can easily rupture.

Approximately 60 percent of people experience epistaxis at some point in their life. Only 6 percent of those who suffer with nosebleeds tend to seek medical treatment, and even fewer require hospitalization.

Though epistaxis can occur at any age, it mostly has a bimodal distribution, afflicting toddlers to children age 10, as well as adults over 50. There are two types of nosebleeds – those that stem from the front of the nose (anterior) which are most common, and those that stem from the back of the nose (posterior) which are less common and more severe in nature.

How Climate Change Might Affect Your Pollen Allergy Symptoms

Climate change affects more than just the temperature here in Buffalo, NY.
Greenhouse gases could also be affecting your pollen allergy symptoms.

Western New York Living features Dr. Paul Young

Western New York Living features Dr. Paul Young | ENT Buffalo NY |