Most of us are somewhat addicted to something: shopping, chocolate, caffeine. Maybe you’re even addicted to something more powerful, like nicotine. However, you probably never knew you could be addicted to your allergy nasal spray. As it turns out though, those who suffer from perpetual congestion often abuse their nasal sprays because they’re not aware of the negative side effects associated with overuse.

Saline Nasal Sprays:

These allergy nasal sprays only contain water and salt. Some versions contain preservatives meant to prevent the growth of mold and bacteria. In any case, these are safe to use, and there are no associated risks simply because they contain no medication.

Steroid Nasal Sprays:

These allergy nasal sprays contain corticosteroids, steroids used to reduce inflammation caused by an overactive immune system. Because they do not begin working immediately, they need to be used every day to be effective. Patients can only obtain steroid nasal sprays with a doctor’s prescription because overuse can cause nosebleeds, headaches, cataracts, and even slowed growth in children.

Antihistamine Nasal Sprays:

These allergy nasal sprays treat seasonal allergy symptoms by directly targeting histamines, the chemical released during immune responses. Because this medication is applied directly to the nose, it is often more effective and safer than pills. Patients can use over-the-counter antihistamine sprays like cromolyn sodium on a daily basis for up to 12 weeks without worrying about side effects.

Decongestant Nasal Sprays:

These allergy nasal sprays will cause the blood vessels in your nose to constrict thereby providing temporary relief. They contain oxymetazoline and pseudoephedrine and are known to be addictive. When the medicine wears off, the nasal tissues will swell creating a sort of “rebound congestion.” If you’ve been using decongestant nasal sprays more and more frequently, you might need to have a physician check for excessive swelling.

Allergy Nasal Spray Alternatives:

Alternatively, you could use a neti pot to flush out mucus and allergens. A neti pot looks a little bit like a teapot. By pouring water in one nostril and letting it drip out the other, you’ll be able to treat your symptoms without using any medicine whatsoever. However, you should make sure to use sterilized water and to clean your neti pot regularly to prevent the growth of bacteria.

Which Allergy Medicine Should You Use?

Buffalonians know that the pollen count in Western New York is particularly high. When your symptoms are particularly bad, you can use over-the-counter antihistamines to keep the sniffles in check. Today, we’re going to review Zyrtec and Claritin–both non-prescription allergy medicine—to see how they compare, once and for all.

Can I Keep My Pet If I Have Cat Allergies?

If you suffer from mild cat allergies, you may still be able to keep your cat. As long as your cat allergies aren’t severe, a few simple lifestyle changes might help ease your symptoms on a daily basis. Keep reading, because below you’ll find our best tips for dealing with cat allergies in Buffalo, NY without loading up on drugs and sprays. So, before you come searching for the allergist, try implementing these three easy changes.

WHAT TO KNOW ABOUT EAR SAFETY BEFORE SAYING BON VOYAGE

How to Protect Your Ears During a Flight | You may have packed your bags and booked your hotel, but no trip to the travel agency can teach you how to protect your ears during a flight. Everyone experiences ear discomfort on airplanes because of the rapid change in air pressure during ascent and descent. Thankfully, though, there are ways to, if not prevent the issue entirely, at least mitigate the pain.

The ENT May Not Be Able to Cure Your Sinus Infection

Yellow, green mucus, bad breath, congestion, runny nose, facial pain…uh oh, not another sinus infection. Should you head to the ENT, or should you hold out? If you answered the latter, then you’d be correct. As it turns out, there is no sinus infection cure for viral infections, so you’re better off waiting it out a bit.

What is the allergy forecast in Buffalo, NY?

The Buffalo, NY allergy forecast can tell you the daily pollen count for specific plants and trees in that area. By measuring the average number of grains of pollen per cubic meter of air, the pollen count serves as a rough guide to breathing comfort for anyone who may suffer from environmental allergies.

WNY Living | Dr. Paul Young, MD

WNY Living | Dr Paul Young MD | ENT Buffalo NY Janet Snyder: From Allergy problems to tonsillitis, otolaryngologists also knows as ENT’s, treat problems of the ears, nose and throat. Here to shed light on those problems and what can be done is Dr Paul Young. Thank you...

SOMETHING SMELL FISHY TO YOU? NO? HOW TO DEAL WITH POOR SENSE OF SMELL

When you have a poor sense of smell, not only can’t you detect aromas, but you also can’t taste your food or appreciate its complex flavors. If the world around you is depressingly bland, you might want to visit your ENT to see if you are, in fact, suffering from a smell disorder.

If You Notice These Signs, You Need a WNY Pediatric ENT Now

If you feel like there’s a layer of snot covering your children’s fingertips during most hours of the day, you’re not alone. Kids get sick all the time because they’re still building their immune system. However, you should know when to stir up a pot of chicken soup and when to bring your child in to see a WNY Pediatric ENT.

Why is Buffalo’s Allergy Report So Bad?

Ever checked out the allergy report in Buffalo, NY in relation to the rest of the country? Though it differs from year to year, Buffalo consistently ranks within the top worst cities for allergies. Why is this exactly?
What is the Allergy Report in Buffalo, NY? Buffalo ranked 16 according to Live Science’s average report in 2013 based on the average pollen count, the ratio of allergists to patients, and the rate of allergy medicine use.

Meet a Top ENT Doctor in Buffalo, NY

We love Dr. Paul Young for his kindness, compassion, and medical insight. Here’s why we think he is one of the top ENT doctors in Buffalo, NY. | After receiving his M.D. from the State University of New York at Buffalo, Dr. Paul Young went on to become the clinical associate professor of ENT in UB’s medical school and the director of otolaryngology at Millard Fillmore Suburban Hospital.