According to the American Migraine Foundation, self-diagnosed sinus headaches are actually migraines about 90% of the time. While sinus headaches are a fairly common symptom of seasonal and environmental allergies, allergens can often trigger migraines. Since it’s difficult to tell the difference between different kinds of pain, most people never know otherwise. However, allergy headaches and migraines are treated very differently, so it’s important that you know what each one is and how you should respond.

What is the Difference Between an Allergy Headache and a Migraine?

In an allergy headache, the pain is concentrated around the sinuses. The pain is usually accompanied by congestion and a post-nasal drip. It usually lasts for many days but goes away with treatment.

A migraine headache is associated with sensitivity to light and sound and, in many cases, nausea. The most unique aspect of a migraine is the aura. When the blood vessels in the head start to constrict, many people experience unique symptoms such as blurry vision or tunnel vision. Usually described as a throbbing pain on one or both sides of the head, a migraine typically last for a few hours but can last up to a few days.

Can My Allergies Give Me a Migraine?

Allergies don’t necessarily cause migraines, but those who suffer from allergies are about 10 times as likely to have migraines as those who don’t. Migraines can be caused by external stimulants, like allergens, but they are just as often linked to stress, a lack of exercise, and irregular sleep patterns.

How Do I Treat Allergy Headaches and Migraines?

You should focus on treating the allergies first because your symptoms are probably at the root of the problem. There are over-the-counter and prescription medications designed specifically for migraines, and you can ask your physician about these. However, if you’re in a pinch, take some ibuprofen for the pain and a bit of caffeine to help dilate the blood vessels in your head. You should also start keeping a symptom diary. Take notes of what you’re eating, where you are, and what you’re doing every time you start to feel a headache.

Final Thoughts:

Allergy headaches and migraines can be downright debilitating. If you’re suffering, pay attention to see what kind of pain you feel. The better you can describe your symptoms, the better your doctor will be able to treat you and the quicker you’ll find relief.

Top 5 Over-the-Counter Allergy Eye Drops

Red, itchy eyes, otherwise known as allergic conjunctivitis, are one of the most common symptoms of hay fever here in Buffalo, NY, and while there’s no cure, over-the-counter allergy eye drops can help bring temporary relief. However, if symptoms worsen, make sure to see a physician about prescription eye drops. While over-the-counter products may be fine for allergic rhinitis, you’ll need something stronger if you come down with a bacterial or viral infection.

What ENT Drs in Amherst Want You to Know About Honey

Buffalo, NY natives know how to brave the tough winter weather, but they don’t always know how to control rough winter allergy symptoms.

WHAT TO DO ABOUT ALLERGIES WHEN THE BIRDS AND THE BEES COME OUT AGAIN

What You Need to Know About Your ENT and Allergies Before Spring | If you’ve been living with an allergy, you know how it can seriously impact your everyday life. Your local ENT and allergies specialist will be able to run tests to better identify your allergens and explain to you how best to avoid your triggers and live a more stress-free summer.

3 Easy Ways to Sleep Better with Allergies

You haven’t noticed your allergies all day until you’re ready to go to bed when suddenly your symptoms hit you. With a runny nose and itchy eyes, how are you ever going to get any sleep? As it turns out, yes, allergy levels in Buffalo, NY tend to rise at night. While pollen levels are highest in the morning, the bedroom tends to aggravate symptoms.

You’ll Never Guess How Rain Affects Your Pollen Allergies

If you have a pollen allergy in Buffalo, NY, will the rain over these cooler months ease your
symptoms or aggravate them further?

Western New York Living features Dr. Paul Young

Western New York Living features Dr. Paul Young | ENT Buffalo NY |

Why should you visit an ENT Clinic in Buffalo, NY?

An ENT is a physician trained to diagnose and treat any conditions related to the ears, nose, and throat. If you’ve been suffering from sinus pressure, itchy eyes, or constant infections, it may be time to visit a specialist. Here’s how we can help you at our ENT clinic in Buffalo, NY.

Do I Need an ENT Specialist in WNY for Tinnitus?

Do you hear a constant buzzing in your ears? You may be suffering from tinnitus, which is characterized by a perpetual chirping or ringing in the ears even when no noise is present. Tinnitus is technically a symptom and not a condition, and so there is no cure for it. However, an ENT specialist in WNY may be able to treat the underlying cause, which may, in fact, be an ear infection, hardening of bones in the middle ear, hearing loss, or other related condition.

Nosebleeds ~ the drippy (but not so dreadful) reality

Epistaxis, a condition commonly referred to as nosebleeds, occurs at the vascular area within the nose, which can bleed profusely as a result of facial trauma. The nose’s arterioles (tiny blood vessels) are vulnerably positioned and thus can easily rupture.

Approximately 60 percent of people experience epistaxis at some point in their life. Only 6 percent of those who suffer with nosebleeds tend to seek medical treatment, and even fewer require hospitalization.

Though epistaxis can occur at any age, it mostly has a bimodal distribution, afflicting toddlers to children age 10, as well as adults over 50. There are two types of nosebleeds – those that stem from the front of the nose (anterior) which are most common, and those that stem from the back of the nose (posterior) which are less common and more severe in nature.

Top 3 Myths About Seasonal Allergies Symptoms

Sometimes old wives’ tales are true, but more often than not, they turn out to be false. The case is definitely true for seasonal allergies symptoms. Here we’re going to debunk the three most common allergy myths. We don’t know where these stories came from, but there is definitely no scientific evidence behind them.